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These Are The 10 Snobbiest Small Cities In America

Are only the finer things in life good enough for you? Then you’ll fit right in with the folks in these 10 snooty little cities.

Laura Allan

93 articles, 1 comments

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You know, it’s okay to have refined tastes in life. Knowing a Cabernet from a Merlot is nothing to be ashamed of, and appreciating the different periods in Picasso’s career isn’t a bad thing. Still, if you like the finer things and are proud to proclaim it to all, you’re probably going to be labeled a snob at some point.

But you’re not alone. In fact, there are whole cities of people like you who are likely to be called snobby by non-residents. Here at the Movoto Real Estate Blog, we’re a bit snobby ourselves, especially when it comes to houses. So, we thought we’d take a look at which small cities would be right for people who are a little more highbrow than the rest. Those Snobbiest Small Cities in America are:

1. Palo Alto, CA
2. Bethesda, MD
3. Brookline, MA
4. San Rafael, CA
5. Walnut Creek, CA
6. Hoboken, NJ
7. Oak Park, IL
8. Encinitas, CA (tie)
8. Rockville, MD (tie)
10. Laguna Niguel, CA

As in our Snobbiest Mid-Sized Cities list, California reigns supreme in the elitism department, but that’s hardly surprising. It is a pretty wonderful place, after all, and Californians know it. If you want to see where your hometown ranked, you can check the 50 snobbiest cities at the bottom of the list. So, what is that certain je ne sais quoi that makes a place considered snooty? Why, it’s simply obvious if you look at it the right way.

How We Created This Ranking

When creating this ranking, we had to refine our search a little, as well as our tastes. Still, we kept this by the numbers, as we do with all our Big Deal Lists.

We first made a list of places in the U.S. with populations between 65,000 and 45,000 people. Then, we collected data from the 2010 U.S. Census and business listings in criteria that many consider snobby (think Frasier and Niles Crane):

  • Median home price (the higher the better)
  • Median household income (the higher the better)
  • Percent of population with a college degree (the higher the better)
  • Private schools per capita (the more the better)
  • Performing arts per capita (the more the better)
  • Art galleries per capita (the more the better)
  • Fast food restaurants per capita (the fewer the better)

We omitted any places that we could not get the data for, and that left us with 309 places. Then, we ranked each place in each category from one to 309, with scores closer to one being better and more snobby. Once we had that, we averaged each place’s rankings into one Big Deal Score. The place with the number closest to one for that score became our snobbiest place.

Now, as we said earlier, “snobby” doesn’t necessarily mean bad. Most of these are wealthy communities with many opportunities for work, education, and culture. Heck, we’d probably be pleased as punch to live in any one of these. However, with all that culture, wealth, and exclusivity comes people who have simply the most rigid of standards that must always be met. These 10 places cater more to those sorts of people.

Let’s look more in depth at why each of these simply devine locales ranked where they did in our rigid standards then, shall we?

1. Palo Alto, CA

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Jun Seita

Consistently, Palo Alto has been ranked one of the wealthiest and best educated places in the nation. And they know it, too.

Locals are proud of where they live and arent afraid to brag about it if it comes up in conversation (or even if it doesn’t). However, with the numbers they raked in for our list, they certainly deserve their bragging rights.

This place had the highest median home price (over $1 million on average), the fourth highest household income, and the fourth highest percent of college grads at nearly 80 percent.

It also had a large amount of private schools, so that little Junior can be brought up right, and a wide selection of art galleries for the more cultured type to peruse.

Throw in such delightful attractions such as the West Bay Opera, and you have a perfect place for the snooty to live, love, and play their way.

2. Bethesda, MD

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Keith Allison

It’s been said that you’ve got to be carefully taught, and Bethesda locals have certainly got that part of being snob down pat.

Over 83 percent of locals have at least a college degree, which is the highest percent on our entire list.

What’s more is that this place had the third highest household income and the highest median home price, so that people who wish to live well and be known for it won’t have much trouble around these parts.

While this place did have quite a bit of fast food, it also had a ton of performing arts and arts galleries, as well as the 15th highest private schools rank. Besides, with eateries such as Bistro Provence around for those who like upscale french cuisine, who would want to get a fast food burger anyway?

3. Brookline, MA

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Kinniska_Designs

Home of The Country Club, one of the oldest country clubs in the world, Brookline has a long history of snobbery.

Nowadays, however, it boasts being a wonderful place to live, start a family, or retire. At least, for those well off enough to afford it. The median home price here is $681,900, so if you’re looking to move here, you better start saving up now (and check our listings).

People here are quite well educated in the ways of culture and refined living, especially considering their third place rank in college graduation percentage.

They also seem to know a thing or two about healthy eating, seeing as they had the third fewest non-fast food restaurants per capita. Or maybe they just prefer not to insult their taste buds with anything less than the amazing hanger steak at the Barcelona Wine Bar.

4. San Rafael, CA

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Marla Showfer

The snobs around these parts are not likely as wealthy or intensely educated as in our top three, but they certainly know a thing or two about culture.

With a ton of art galleries and the third best performing arts on our list, it’s easy to see where locals get their wealth of knowledge about creative vices. Besides, quite a few celebs make appearances at the Christopher B Smith Rafael Film Center, and who knows more about snobbery than celebrities?

To live here, you might have to be at least a little wealthy, however. The median home price here ranked fifth, at $811,000, so you can bet your new chateau will have space for that grand piano you’ve always wanted to dabble with.

5. Walnut Creek, CA

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Keith Cuddeback

Another California location, and yet another place that knows how to indulge in arts and culture.

Locals here aren’t afraid to get a little classy by visiting one of the numerous art galleries or one of the 10th best performing arts attractions, like Diablo Ballet. This place also had a slightly more educated attitude, considering over 60 percent of locals had a college degree.

There’s quite a bit of fast food here, but foodies know well that there are plenty of more elite places to tickle the tastebuds. If you want to know what it is to be a food snob in Walnut Creek, just stop by Va de Vi Bistro & Wine Bar, and you might just spoil yourself for life.

6. Hoboken, NJ

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user r0sss

Locals here definitely are world-wise and well off. For starters, this place had the ninth highest household income on our list, with a startling average of over $100,000 per household. Hoboken also had the seventh highest percentage of population with at least a college degree. True, there were fewer private schools here, but there were other stats to keep this place elite.

The performing arts and art galleries here both ranked in the top 30, and there were few non-fast food restaurants here for those who can’t stand not to have filet mignon with every meal. If you’re more into the art culture, you can always hobnob in Hoboken at the Barsky Gallery.

7. Oak Park, IL

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user GO_TO_2040

You might be surprised to see another Illinois locale on our list (especially after Naperville ranked so highly on our last snobby piece), but the reasons this place is good for snobs are pretty apparent.

If locals aren’t catching brunch at Hemmingway’s Bistro, you might be able to find them strolling through one of the numerous art galleries in the area, the sixth most per capita on our list.

Of course, these fine folks aren’t just elitist in the ways of art, they’re also well rounded in their education. With many private schools and with over 60 percent of the population having a college degree, Oak Park locals know a thing or two about how to hold themselves in all sorts of company.

8. Encinitas, CA

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Joe Wolf

The first location in our two-way tie for eighth place, Encinitas has a lot to offer.

Between the Self Realization Fellowship Hermitage & Meditation Gardens for people wishing to enjoy only the best scenery, and the Encinitas Spa (for those who can afford it) this place is just better than other locations in so many ways. Many locals will be the first to tell you just that, too.

Encinitas is pretty snob-friendly, just by the numbers as well. This place had the sixth best performing arts, featuring attractions as the Encinitas Ballet, and a wide number of art galleries to get your creative culture from.

Of course, every snob knows that these attractions don’t come cheap, and thus the median home price here is the 11th most expensive on our list.

8. Rockville, MD

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Ryan Crierie

Tied with Encinitas, this Maryland locale had some seriously snooty stats keeping it in the ranking for best hometowns for the highbrow.

For starters, locals can send their little ones to elite private schools, the fifth most per capita on our list. And once Junior has accrued all this handy knowledge,they can flex their artistically-inclined minds at one of the numerous art galleries or museums in the area.

More than that, people who live here are likely to continue on to academic greatness, with over 61 percent of the population gaining at least a college degree.

With all of that education and study going on, is it any wonder that the elite locals make an average household income of almost $90,000?

10. Laguna Niguel, CA

10 Snobbiest Small Places In America

Source: Flickr user Thomas Hawk

The last refined hometown at the fifth Californian city on our list is Laguna Niguel, which had great snob-scores across the board.

There were plenty of art galleries and performing arts to go around, and parents will be pleased to see there are many private schools to select from. Besides that, there are many upscale neighborhoods with amazing views. Simply the best place to have a black tie dinner affair, don’t you agree?

Of course, those beautiful views don’t come cheap, and homes here cost an average of $748,300. Then again, the locals here make an average household income of over $97,000, so maybe that price tag is a little more reasonable for them.

After all, living well among others like you is just worth the price of admission.

The Best Of Life For The Best People

Not everyone in these places thinks they’re the crème de la crème, or looks down their noses at others, but these 10 cities are just more comfortable for what society calls “snobby” folk.

In all honesty, our criteria denote safe, wealthy, and interesting places to live (if you like that sort of thing.) And who are we if we cannot laugh at ourselves a little? We’ll see you in the comments section, once you finish that next glass of Pinot Noir, of course.

Snobbiest Small Places In America

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posted on: July 24, 2014
472,158 views, 43 comments

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43 Comments

  1. Jonathan Lee

    “The median home price here ranked fifth, at $811,000, so you can bet your new chateau will have space for that grand piano you’ve always wanted to dabble with.”

    Clearly, this author hasn’t spent much time in Marin. $800k might get you snob status, but not a lot of space!

  2. Eileen C

    Really, The more fast food places the better? there are towns near me (NJ) that prohibit any fast food franchises lest they attract an unsavory element.

  3. Ryan

    Clearly, you have never been to Boca Raton, FL.

  4. David Eichler

    I don’t think being wealthy, cultured and enjoying life inherently means being snobby. I know the California areas very well, and I have also lived in or around Bethesda and Rockville, albeit quite a while ago. I would not characterize those areas as very snobby, though there are definitely parts of the Washington DC and San Francisco Bay Area that I would characterize as a bit snobby.

  5. Michael S.

    More fast food joints per capita, the better? How can a place be snobby
    with McDonalds, Hardees, Burger Kings and who what else on street corner after street corner?

  6. Stephanie

    What a ridiculous article! Hoboken,NJ? Skokie,IL? Cupertino,CA?? As a long-time resident of #1 snob city Palo Alto, I am laughing out loud at your criteria. Snobbiness is for old-money towns where it matters who your parents are, what schools you went to, and how your money was earned. Brookline,MA and Bethesda,MD might qualify, but on the whole, your survey is deeply flawed. There is too much new money, too many immigrants and too much diversity in Palo Alto for it to be called snobby. If you want snobby, try certain segments of old-money San Francisc!

  7. Bethesda Jack

    I live in Bethesda, and we pride ourselves in our snootiness. In fact, I’m sorry we only finished 2nd! Tut! Tut!

  8. Christina

    First off – a few folks leaving comments read the criteria incorrectly – it is LEAST fast food restaurants.

    However, otherwise I agree with just about everyone that this list is incredibly short sighted. You use the SRF Hindu based CHURCH & RETREAT as a sign of snobbery for Encinitas??? I have no proper words to describe how dumb this is. Clearly you know nothing of these places or the people in them at all.

    To call this survey deeply flawed is an understatement. More like Click Bait and yes, I fell for it, but as a neighbor to Encinitas and childhood attendee at the SRF summer camps I had to defend this fine beach side town. The snobs? They are the old money folks in La Jolla & Rancho Santa Fe. Try blending into the social scene there if you are not rich, white, Christian & straight – it does not happen! Encinitas folks will welcome *anyone* with open arms.

  9. Lorri Greene

    I live in Encinitas, Ca, which is really a community that has 5 communities within it. They are, Cardiff-by-the-Sea (where I live); Old Encinitas; Leucadia; New Encinitas; and Olevenhein. We incorporated in 1986 so we could control the character of each of these communities, instead of the County of San Diego.
    Snobbery is not how I would define any of our communities, or the people in them. We are a small beach town, and yes there are a lot of things to do. However, we have some of the most caring, giving people living here.
    Yes, we have some fast food restaurants. We also have some vegetarian restaurants; seafood restaurants; steak restaurants, etc. Our community is active and we have a lot of outdoor activities. We strive to keep the environment clean; and we speak up at City Council meetings if we don’t like what is happening in our community. And, unfortunately, the prices of property have gone sky high, meaning lot of younger folks cannot move here. This seems to be happening among many beach communities in Southern California.
    Most of my friends give back to the community, and to others. So if this equals being a snob, so be it.

  10. Luc

    This is an insulting list. Just because someone is educated and with refined tastes, doesn’t automatically make them a snob. There are plenty of uneducated people who are disgustingly snotty and elitist. This list sounds like a republican propaganda where they equated an educated man like President Obama with being an elitist and snob. An educated public should be what this nation strives toward. Instead we get stupid people writing stupid articles, like this one!

  11. Ralphy

    I lived in Palo Alto for 10 years and now I live in Beverly Hills. I like the idea of trying to quantify and creating a snobiness index, but were there not “data” for Beverly Hills? I know BHs is in the middle of Los Angeles and my not be considered a small city, but the official population is around 35,000 (you should lower the criteria on population). Unofficially, it HAS to be the snobbiest of them all, hands down. Subjectively, based on what I observe, this is #1 for so many reasons. Please consider as it would be very interesting for quantification purposes. Palo Altan’s may be wealthy but at least they don’t have Rodeo Drive.

  12. Bethesda Jack

    Who’s kidding who here? Everyone who lives in one of the snobby communities is thrilled to be listed! In fact, I suspect the folks lower on the list wish they were up where Bethesda is listed!!!

  13. John

    Glad to see Montgomery County, MD hit a home run with Bethesda and Rockville. Should have been Bethesda and Potomac. Survey results influenced by liberal carpetbaggers from NY/NJ/New England that flock to DC area, whine/complain about everything, turned normal political matters into socialist debates with no end game and talk about how great their rich upbringing “Up North” was. Get out of their way on I-95 North on Friday nights as they run home to relive their bucolic and caustic pasts. Locals find them distasteful, greedy, arrogant and move one or two counties away so their kids won’t turn out like them. Basically they are the OVEREDUCATED/UNDERUTILIZED crowd as they continue to be for a variety of social causes except they are the NITBYBY crowd (Not in Their Back Yard But Yours), call the police when they see someone of diversity in their neighborhood, etc.

  14. Jak

    The best part is that you people take this so seriously…I live in Walnut Creek and we are definitely better than you.

  15. Larry

    Stephanie is most certainly correct. Palo Alto, a lovely small city is very far from being a snobbish place. Too much of the money there is New Money, held by people who are more interested in working & advancing than in being snooty.
    Go where the “Old Money” is for snobbery.
    This article is a million miles off the mark!

  16. larry

    Right you are Luc!!!!! 100%

  17. Ellis

    Really?! I live in Encinitas and your description bears no resemblance to the town I live in. It is a great place to live–good restaurants, beaches, etc. But snobby? Very down to earth. Yes, high home prices and college educated people does not make for snobbery necessarily but for well, good, educated neighbors. But all that live theater? Really? It’s all in La Jolla and San Diego and other coastal communities nearby not really in Encinitas. Sorry

  18. RedApe

    Disagree with the criteria. Education, the number of sit-down restaurants (perhaps local and family-owned), and even Why not count the number of gated communities, exclusive “clubs”, member-only golf-clubs, or other criteria of EXCLUSIVITY. Anyone can walk into a mom-and-pop cafe and I’ve been to a lot of University towns where education standards are high but there’s an active town-gown mix.

    For example, Encinitas is a pretty open place that accepts a wide range of lifestyles and cultures.

    Snobby, for me would be a place that has zoning laws that doesn’t allow new people in, that have long-established membership-only groups with “recommendation requirements”, that have “neighborhood associations”, gated-communities, lots of Private Academies and charter schools, with long enrollment lists.

    Of course there’s also another type of snobbiness…or maybe call it insularism or parochialism or nativism…where outsiders are looked upon with suspicion and people of different color or dress are assumed to be foreigners.

    At least people can become better educated, eventually make more money, and have the wherewithal to afford to see and appreciate the arts (and many of those Art Centers have performers as wide-ranging as Wilco, The Blind Boys of Alabama, African Dance troupes, Salsa bands, etc. not just Ballet and Opera).

  19. Alice

    There is a huge difference between people from Palo Alto and the people who just moved here. Out of habit I still tell people when they ask where I am from, “a small town just south of San Francisco” because no one knew where Palo Alto was let alone recognised the name.

    Also, we have art galleries?!? And since when did we have 11 performing art centres?! I can only think of two at the Lucie Stern, and there’s ones at Stanford. I also had no idea that many private schools existed, and I don’t necessarily buy it either.

  20. Snob-o-rini

    Cool! I have lived in Palo Alto for 26 years, and am looking forward to the T-shirts!

  21. Yady

    Cristina is right!!! I guess people needs to read…better…

  22. Italian Princess

    Petaluma has changed its tone quite a bit unfortunately. I have lived here for years. I left for the east coast and came back and noticed a significant change in attitude here. It is quite sad! The change in tone and atmosphere is taking away from the dairy town feel.

  23. ScarletDove

    I was born in Georgetown, Washington, DC, moved to Bethesda at age 4, was educated and grew up there, moved to Kensington, right on edge of Bethesda, still lived in my home 47 yrs, shop here and in Rockville, MD; but for me it is time to leave this snotty, emotionless and unfriendly environment. Mind you I am 72 yrs old and at the time I lived in Bethesda it was a friendly small time suburb of DC. It is now full of snotty elite liberals which accounts for the snobbery problem. Then they set sanctuary for illegal aliens who service these snotty people. Many govt professionals who are probably 80-90% liberal. Same for Rockville, but not as bad as B-town. Worse part is that it is no longer a friendly place nor it is a nice place to love unless you are snotty and unfriendly. I can relate better with the wildlife from Rock Creek Park than my neighbors. The comment from Luc confirms my comments about this snotty area. I also learned Luc, that just because some one is well educated, they are not necessarily decent; I ran into many of that type during my 35 yrs at the HHS/NIH in Bethesda.

  24. ScarletDove

    Bethesda Jack, newcomers with your attitude is precisely what has ruined the Bethesda friendliness and homeyness over the last 20 years. Pride being snotty and unfriendly?

  25. Susan

    As a professional who analyzes data and derives meaning out of numbers, this ‘report’ made me hold my nose.

  26. Susan

    And yes, you can call me a report snob.

  27. Jim

    OK WAIT, CALLING BS. For Laguna Niguel, where are there plenty of art galleries and performing arts centers to go around???? WHAT? I”ve lived here for 17 years and still haven’t found them! Or are they confusing Laguna Beach with Laguna Niguel? Is this a joke, or just that poorly researched? Please someone tell me where these secret art galleries are? The truth is Laguna Niguel is way too conservative of a city for an art scene. The only art districts in the area are Santa Ana, Laguna Beach (kind of, it’s more crafts than anything), and Los Angeles… smh

  28. Taco

    This is totally absurd. I have spent my whole life in the Bay Area and your criteria is totally inaccurate. Palo Alto is closer to Carmel-by-the-sea (high snob area more so than anything) than anything else listed in the San Francisco Bay. Castro Valley and Dublin are the butt of jokes in those parts. The worst of a snob cluster, the place with the gas stations and stores so the downtowns of other cities can look good. They’re Dangerfield and the surrounding communities are all Knight from Caddyshack. The folks that did this are so dim that they listed the place where the KKK calls home (the hills of Castro Valley) in Northern California which definitely knocks them out of the snob running for a Pleasanton or a Livermore. So much more snobbery there. I dare you to drive through Dublin and Castro Valley and see snobbery. Bad job. Your system sucks because snobbery is based more around exclusive clubs and country clubs keeping others out. Nothing to do with degrees, how many snobs came from dropping out? You should see the Pebble Beach roster of people where hard work and vicious dog-eat-dog went further than any of your stats listed. Stop wasting our time. Palo Alto is right, rest of the list sucks.

  29. Proteus

    Most people won’t believe this unless you live in Hoboken, but Hoboken has become a very wealthy town. It has become incredibly expensive and the real estate is only for the rich. The rents are extremely high and are comparable with New York City unless you have lived in a rent-controlled apartment for years. There are still a fare amount of tenants in town, but they are tenants who have money until they buy their condos which have proliferated and decimated the rental units available. Hoboken is very educated and elite. It has left the remaining hanger-ons like me harder and harder to exist amongst the wealthy. Hoboken was affordable once and blue-collar at one time but since the gentrification in the 1980′s, it is mainly white and rich now. As the bohemians and elderly are forced out, eventually it will become a ‘Greenwich’ on the Hudson. (Think of what is happening to San Francisco.) The residents who are affluent and well-educated are out-numbering the original residents. The town has changed dramatically. One can not make a face when Hoboken is mentioned. It is a very, very wealthy town now with many, many millionaires. I am not one of them.

  30. snobby mc snobbish

    HaHaHa!
    How is this journalism? So inaccurate using random “numbers” to make the case. This is laughable.

    I can write random things and call them facts, but I don’t because that would be a waste of time.

    Please don’t resort to this kind of reporting. Start by looking up what the term snob means in something other than urban dictionary and then posting an actual list that makes sense based on data that is objective. I can name 10 places “snobbier” than most of these. (FYI Mill Valley is 10x more snobby than San Rafael, etc)

  31. another snob

    Palo Alto’s pride is derived from its wealth, education and being almost centrally located between SF Bay Area and Silicon Valley. I will admit that the cost of housing has increase in the past 20 years, but its done so in other major metro’s too.

    And the number of fastfood restaurants as a 20% means to measuring the level of snobbery.
    Get real, fastfood is bad for you, so to go Redwood City or Mountain View/Sunnyvale.

  32. we're snobs??? Most definitely!!!

    Here in East P.A., us upper class folk are all up tight and bigots. We hatin on them poor white trash on da westside of hwy101. They all edumacated and rightious bout der clothes and food.
    Da have no Fried chiken and waffle an on authentic soul food places.
    So we dont want them in our hood

  33. Swamp Witch

    Seriously? Oak Park, IL??? What happened to the North Shore of Chicago? Kenilworth – largest population of millionaires per capita in the country, and some of the most expensive housing, with Wilmette, Winnetka, Glencoe, Highland Park and Lake Forest not so far behind! Oak Park is probably better known for it’s over priced Frank Lloyd Wright wannbe mail order houses and its battered women’s shelters!

  34. Bill z

    I live in Hoboken and can definitely vouch for its inclusion on this list. The only reason I’m here is the proximity to work and the city…….the women here in particular are extremely unfriendly….stuck up with their noses up in the air….it’s virtually impossible to meet anybody of the opposite sex if you’re a guy and it’s very frustrating because just about every girl here is hot……I’ve lived in lower income areas and it near much easier to pick up girls

  35. Wag Halen

    People are entitled to their opinion. Here’s ours: Encinitas moms are so hot!

  36. tjam

    Hoboken has the most educated but least intelligent number of residents per square mile.

  37. Jay

    This is just a sensationalized,contrived, unscientific, media hype for realtors. You really didn’t look into any of those communities to find that the qualities of what you assumed to be “affluent” were. Those of us who live there admit you achieved your goal of “starting conversations about cities”, just like the statement “have you stopped beating your wife yet?”

  38. pamela

    HILARIOUS! I will be sure to go ask the local homeless population and also be sure to ask the resident meth addicts of San Rafael, also the poor immigrants who just get by and the local university student population. I am sure they will all agree. Given that most of Marin County turns its nose at San Rafael (and they are among the wealthiest counties in the country), I find this inclusion of San Rafael incredibly amusing. That said, if snobby equates to multi-cultural and colorful, San Rafael wins in spades.

  39. Larry

    They are only interested in the number of people who read their drivel, as each hit on the site counts towards their increasing advertising rates

  40. Guesty

    You really should add the states to the table of cities. It’s not immediately obvious where Chesterfield (for example) is.

  41. Kevin

    Agree with Guesty. It strange that you published states on the largest city list (the most obvious) and not on the small and mid-sized lists.

  42. Helena Lake

    I find your ranking of Encinitas based on the parameters you suggest are at the least, offensive! Encinintas is one of the best places to live on this planet!
    Most who live here care about the environment, peoples health and quality of living. Most people here are caring, considerate and lovely humans.
    You might want to visit this place before you make such bold assumptions of a city.

  43. Insulted

    You’ve written an article that is highly offensive and didn’t even have the decency to actually use any criteria that would truly give you a sense of the communities you’ve insulted. You incorrectly assume that wealth = being snobby . Would you say that Bill Gates in a snob? Before writing an article about the “snobbiest” places in America, I suggest you do some actual investigative journalism (not simply looking up Wikipedia data on the web). You even dilute your own argument by saying that “Now, as we said earlier, “snobby” doesn’t necessarily mean bad.” I re-read it and not only did you NOT say it earlier, but Snobby by definition DOES have negative connotations. So here, b/c you probably didn’t even bother to look it up before using it in your title, from Dictionary.com Snobby is: “condescending, patronizing, or socially exclusive; snobbish.” So your augment claims that the majority of the people living in these communities are condescending, socially exclusive and “proud to proclaim it to all” (your words). If you’re going to make such an asinine assumption, at least use criteria that would better reflect that type of behavior. How many private social clubs do they have? How many private country clubs that practice exclusion in their membership? How many gated housing developments are there? Is there a sense of community or do people stay locked up in there homes? These are some of the parameters that would start to give a hint of the sense of “community”. As a resident of one of your top ten, I know that we have 0 private country clubs, we do have just a few gated communities (but they’re new to town), but if you actually spent ANY time here, you would know immediately that the residents of this city are FAR from snobby. We are Artists, Teachers, Entrepreneurs, Civil Servants, Bar Tenders, Doctors, Tax Accountants, Restaurant Servers, Business Owners, and ALL sorts of normal average every day non-snobby people. I accuse you of a slanderous attempt to grab headlines. You should be ashamed of such an article and should write an apology to the people in the towns on this list. Then you should think long and hard before attempting another “blog” entry, maybe keep your thoughts to yourself instead if you have nothing nice to say.

 

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