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Tweets by Turf: Can Twitter Data Determine Where Your State’s Morals Lie?

We analyzed over 300,000 tweets that contained 30 everyday terms to find out.

Chris Kolmar

Chief Armchair Economist

161 articles, 137 comments

Family and money: two topics that are constantly on the minds of Americans each and every day. But which one is talked about more? If one region talks more about money, does this reflect upon the values of that particular part of the country? To find out, we analyzed over 300,000 tweets that contained 30 everyday terms. For example, family, money, college, school, church, sports, and sex were some of the words searched for. This data allowed us to see which areas of the United States were talking about a specific topic, or term, the most. We then combined that information with the data from another term to create interesting “matchups,” and to see which term “won” each state, very similar to an election map.

Often times our matchups were dominated by one of the terms. For example, in “Dog vs. Cat,” dog won pretty much every state. So after going through all of the comparisons, we’ve compiled the most intriguing spread here.

Twitter-maps first half

Things got interesting (and this is not all that surprising) when we started comparing different topics to “sex.” For example, in “Beer vs. Sex,” all of the states in the South seem to have more interest in (or at least tweet more about) sex except for Florida.

In “Church vs. Sex,” the data broke down almost as expected, with the South and parts of the Midwest tweeting more about church.

Twitter-maps second half

While we may not be able to directly state that the number of tweets about a specific topic are a reflection of certain values, it’s a worthy endeavor that is sure to spark a conversation.

To see each individual comparison map, click the arrows on the flipbook below. Feel free to save and share the images. For the full infographic, follow this link.

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posted on: May 8, 2014
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